My Son’s ADHD Journey Success So Far

By | June 1, 2016
I wish I knew How To Stop a Child With ADHD Climbing the Walls

I wish I knew How To Stop a Child With ADHD Climbing the Walls

Sometimes bloggers get a little bit off track and blogs (being blogs) get off-topic.  This is a bit off topic to my normal blog posts, but it’s important to me and may also be of interest to some of you.

So it’s the first of June. I can’t believe how much time seems to have flown since Little D started on Ritalin in late April.

Overall, it has been an amazing success for his ability to concentrate and stay calm.

Until Night Time – Getting an ADHD Child to Sleep

Nights are frequently mental. He is so hyped from being in a focused state all day, when it comes time to sleep, his ADHD has taken control!

He’s tired, overtired and crazy. He finds it much harder to control himself at night, and getting to sleep is such a trial.

Nothing seems to work.

We have an appointment booked for the Paediatrician on 15th – I’m going to write a list of the questions I need to ask him:
– I’ve heard about Melatonin – what does it do? Is it dangerous? Will it help him to relax and get to sleep? Update April 2017 – He has been using Melatonin for months and it has been a godsend. Night times are less hard work nowadays.
– I’m not (yet) worried about him eating less, but if it does become a concern, what resources can you recommend?

I don’t even know what other questions to ask.

I know that the blue light from his iPad is preventing him from sleeping, so I’ve done some research into methods to prevent blue-light and found that a simple pair of glasses with blue-light blocking technology might be effective. Amazon sells these blue light blocking glasses and there are a lot of reviewers raving about the product. I’m ordering one today (updated 15 April 2017).

What Questions Should I Ask the Pediatrician about ADHD?

Let’s check google!

Ask for a complete physical including a blood test for lead poisoning, low levels of vitamin D, anemia—three conditions that can cause behavior that looks like ADHD. (from http://smartkidssmartparents.com/adhd-pediatrician/) – this post has been disputed in the comments, so take it with a grain of salt.

If you and the child psychiatrist agree that your child has ADHD and you want to try medication, get a referral for a complete cardiovascular workup and an ekg or ecg.(Electrocardiogram) In rare cases, heart problems have occurred with children taking stimulant medications.

Bottom line: If you decide to try ADHD medication for you child, make sure it is prescribed by a psychiatrist and that your child is monitored by the psychiatrist. Pediatricians do not receive the specialized training in these drugs that psychiatrists get. (also from above site) … Scary stuff…

What’s the Difference Between a Psychiatrist and a Psychologist?

.. But I have to ask, why a Psychiatrist and not a Psychologist? Which one is the Doctor first and then gets the Degree on top of that? It’s the Psychologist. No, they’re not just there to lay you down on a couch, they actually have a degree in General Medicine on top of years of more study in Psychology…. OK I need the definition don’t I?

Psychologist:

Wikipedia says:

A psychologist is a professional who evaluates and studies behavior and mental processes[1](see also psychology). Typically, psychologists must have completed a university degree in psychology, which is a master’s degree in some countries and a doctorate in others (e.g., United States, Canada and United Kingdom). This definition of psychologist is non-exclusive; in most jurisdictions, members of other professions (such as counselors and psychiatrists) can also evaluate, diagnose, treat, and study mental processes.[2] Some psychologists, such as clinical and counseling psychologists, provide mental health care, and some psychologists, such as social or organizational psychologists conduct research and provide consultation services.

Psychiatrist:

Wikipedia says:

A psychiatrist is a physician who specializes in psychiatry, which is to say in the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders. Psychiatrists are medical doctors, unlike psychologists, and must evaluate patients to determine whether their symptoms are the result of a physical illness, a combination of physical and mental, or a strictly psychiatric one. The translation from Greek and Latin origin is as follows: “Psych”-Greek transliterated meaning breath, life, soul, spirit or mind; “Iatro” is Greek for physician and -ist in Latin comes from “ista or iste” and the pronoun means “that one” or “specialist”.

OK, so why am I (well not me, my son) being treated by a Paediatrician and a Psychologist?

And is this the best combination of practitioners to treat him?

Don’t get me wrong, I feel that my son’s medical team have done a truly thorough job on diagnosing him – I trust them and will most likely follow their advice. But, I’d like to become a bit better educated so I can be my son’s advocate. So it’s off to study for me!

Questions to ask about ADHD

Well, this leads me to continue my list of questions for my next appointment:

  1. I’ve heard about Melatonin – what does it do? Is it dangerous?
  2. I’m not (yet) worried about him eating less, but if it does become a concern, what resources can you recommend?
  3. Why am I (my son) being treated by a Paediatrician and a Psychologist, and NOT by a Psychiatrist?
  4. Given Wikipedia’s definition of psychiatrists, is it required?
  5. Is ADHD a mental disorder? or is it a physical (gene) disorder?
  6. I’ve read that Telomere length is shorter in people with ADHD – how is Telomere length measured?

Clearly I am very new to this and I need to do much more research.

 

DO YOU have health concerns with your child/ren?

How do you find out more and get yourself educated?  

Let me know in the comments.

 

Making Plans and Setting Goals for Your Brightest Future

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